Pioneers of television: How Lynda Carter broke all barriers – this is her today

Female action heroes were exceedingly rare when I was growing up – maybe that’s why Lynda Carter became such an icon after starring as Wonder Woman in 1975.

For many, she was a hero for a long time during childhood – a lot of girls would wear their mom’s tiara and use a tea towel for a cape to pretend to be Wonder Woman themselves back in the 1970s.

Lynda was one of the most beautiful women in the world. Indeed, in my opinion, she still is …

When I hear the name Lynda Carter, only one thing pops into my head: Her marquee role as Wonder Woman. The TV series, launched during the height of the women’s liberation movement in the ’70s, was one of few Hollywood productions with a female lead.

In many ways, Lynda was a perfect match for the role. She was talented, gorgeous, and had class to match her great sense of humor.

But Lynda also had to overcome several obstacles before she landed the role and was catapulted into stardom. For example, she was not a very experienced actress and clashed with the producers.

Lynda Carter was born in 1951 in Phoenix, Arizona. As early as a 5-year-old, she made her public television debut when she appeared on Lew King’s Talent Show. Growing up, however, another interest took over; music. In high school, Lynda joined a band. As a 15-year-old, she started working extra by singing at a local pizza parlor, earning $25 a weekend.

By then, her parents had divorced, and she had to endure other difficulties in her youth. People gasped when they saw Lynda during her childhood, and she constantly had to face comments about her height.

The Wonder Woman actress has always been quite tall, which gave her an early inferiority complex that she fought hard to turn around.

”All these feelings are left over from the time I was a kid. I mean: I was tall! Somebody would say, ’Oh, are you tall!’ And I giggle and say, ’Yeah, I’m tall!’ I was a clown. Inside I felt like crumbling jelly,” Lynda told reporters in 1979.

But overall, Lynda praised her upbringing. She went to church every Sunday, had picnics, joked around with her sister, and had a mother who dreaded her “going Hollywood.”

“It was so moral, so middle-class, so old-fashioned and so good,” she said.

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